Just For Fun Featuring False Idols

Planning a heist in your next book? We’ve got you covered!

Six TV shows you don't want to miss.

So you’ve got undercover agents in your novel? Or maybe a heist as a central plot point?

Heists are often considered one of the hardest plots to master. There are so many moving parts and convincing the reader you’ve a handle on the plot and the characters is no small feat.

The writing team behind our latest thriller serial, False Idols, has put together a list of must watch TV shows to help you bring nuance and authenticity to your characters as you plan your book’s heist. These shows are sure to be a wealth of information so get your binge-watching, stretchy pants ready, stock up on your favorite snacks, and break out your pad and pen because you’ll want to take notes.

The Americans.

undercover agents

 

 

 

 

An excellent show for when you want to get a feel for undercover agents and their handlers when working in foreign (to them) countries.

Leverage.
heist team

 

 

 

 

A clever and fun show following a crew of high-tech crooks as they attempt to steal from wealthy criminals and corrupt businessmen.

Operation Odessa.

heist documentary

 

 

 

 

 

A documentary about a great, stranger-than-fiction, real-life heist involving the Russian mob and a Cuban drug cartel.

If you’re enjoying this list, don’t forget you can read, or listen to, the first episode of False Idols for free! See how the False Idols writing team put their research to work.

White Collar.

 

 

 

 

 

A fun show with elements of both heists and undercover work. Our own FBI art crime consultant, Bob Wittman, was a consultant on this show as well!

Imposters.

 

 

 

 

 

This dark comedy follows con artist Maddie who marries people and then disappears with their money. Parts of Maddie could almost be a dark-side version of our own False Idol‘s Layla.

Deep Undercover.

deep undercover

 

 

 

 

 

Real-life stories of undercover operations told from the perspective of the undercover agents working the case, created by Joe Pistone (aka Donnie Brasco).


If you enjoyed this article, you might also enjoy Diana Renn delving into the world of Art Relics.

Or perhaps a in-depth look on crafting international intrigue.

 

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