Brian Francis Slatterty

Author

Brian Francis Slattery is the author of Spaceman Blues, Liberation, Lost Everything, and The Family Hightower. Lost Everything won the Philip K. Dick Award in 2012. He’s the arts and culture editor for the New Haven Independent, an editor for the New Haven Review, and a freelance editor for a few not-so-secret public policy think tanks. He also plays music constantly with a few different groups in a bunch of different genres. He has settled with his family just outside of New Haven and admits that elevation above sea level was one of the factors he took into account. For one week out of every year, he enjoys living completely without electricity.

Serial News

New Episode Bookburners S3E13: The Finale “Live in London”

The Bookburners thought they had seen some strange things in their time, but as they watch London become a hellscape, its own buildings rising up and rampaging through the streets, they realize it’s only going to get stranger from here on out.

From The Writers' Room

Brian Francis Slattery on writing Bookburners S3E4: “All in a Day’s Work”

I enjoyed writing this episode for its sense of foreshadowing, the way it lays down a few basic principles that we planned to use for the rest of the season.

From The Writers' Room

Margaret Dunlap on writing Bookburners S3E11: “Crossing Over”

But while the members of Team Three dash around the world (and beyond it) as a matter of course, the most traveling I generally do for the series is an annual flight east for our story summits. I thought it was cool that Andrea had done to research to reference a real artifact, but I figured a picture on the Internet would be the extent of my involvement with the Punic Egg. I didn’t think I’d actually, you know, lay eyes on the damn thing. Until this summer, when where should I find myself but… London

From The Writers' Room

Andrea Phillips on writing Bookburners S3E10: “Into the Woods”

The original concept for this episode as proposed (...by me) during the summit was “Spooky Forest.”

Serial News

New Episode Bookburners S3E10 “Into the Woods”

This is the 10th episode in the third season of Bookburners, a 13-episode serial from Serial Box Publishing. This episode written by Andrea Phillips.

From The Writers' Room

Brian Francis Slattery on writing Bookburners S3E9: “Homecoming”

At this stage in writing Bookbuners, each of us on the writing team has a particular kind of episode that we’re considered to be good at.

Serial News

New Episode Bookburners S3E9 “Homecoming”

This is the 9th episode in the third season of Bookburners, a 13-episode serial from Serial Box Publishing. This episode written by Brian Francis Slattery.

From The Writers' Room

Margaret Dunlap on writing Bookburners S3E7: “Cracks in the World”

In index card form, the episode 7 logline was: “The Halls of Amazon Run Red with Blood.” And well, who wouldn’t want to write that?

From The Writers' Room

Mur Lafferty on writing Bookburners S3E5: “Time Capsule”

One of the most interesting things about Season Three is turning the tables on our existing relationships. Whereas we saw Menchu as the solid, do-no-wrong father figure and Asanti as the rogue, untrustworthy one in season Two, now Menchu is the one with things to hide, and when his secrets come out, he's now the untrustworthy one. 

Serial News

New Episode Bookburners S3E5 “Time Capsule”

This is the 5th episode in the third season of Bookburners, a 13-episode serial from Serial Box Publishing. This episode written by Mur Lafferty.

From The Writers' Room

Brian Francis Slattery on writing Bookburners S3E4: “All in a Day’s Work”

I enjoyed writing this episode for its sense of foreshadowing, the way it lays down a few basic principles that we planned to use for the rest of the season.

From The Writers' Room

Andrea Philips on writing Bookburners S3E3: “Hard Bargain”

Because that's the other side of thrifty writing: on the one hand, you need to use the story threads you have, so they don't go to waste. But just like a diligent farmer saving seeds for next year's crops, serial writers also have to look to the future.

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